JULY 2018

Services

Sunday— 9:30 AM Sunday School, 10:15 AM fellowship, 10:30 AM Worship Service

by: Keith Howell

06/29/2018

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bill's blog

Not much is said about missions at the time of the Protestant Reformation. Martin Luther and John Calvin were more focused on teaching protestant principals of faith, on translations of the Bible into modern European languages, and on developing a Protestant theology. It would be the first Great Awakening on American soil, roughly 1730 -1760, that would inspire any thought of mission work. The religious fervor and personal pietism that grew out of the first Great Awakening in colonial America would inspire men and women to go to the ends of the earth proclaiming the gospel of Jesus Christ. The space for this article is too short to trace all the roots and accomplishments of the Presbyterian mission movement. I grew up in the old southern Presbyterian Church in the United States (PCUS) prior to reunion with the northern church to form the PCUSA in 1983. As a child growing up in the PCUS, I remember distinctly the focus on world missions in China and Korea. According to Michael Parker, in his brief history of American Protestant missions entitled The Year 2010: Two Anniversaries in the History of American Protestant Missions, the PCUS focused its mission efforts in Brazil, China, the Congo, Japan, Korea, and Mexico. Today, one of the largest Presbyterian churches in the world is in Seoul, South Korea, with over 20,000 members! From the Congo and the Sudan, Presbyterian missionaries branched into Cameroon, establishing churches, schools, and hospitals. It is not unusual today to find Cameroonian immigrants to America still practicing their Presbyterian roots in Christianity. My two previous congregations both had members from Cameroon. Michael Parker writes: “Looking back at two hundred years of mission experience, Presbyterians can be proud of our record in mission. Presbyterian churches have been established in more than eighty countries throughout Africa, Asia, and Latin America. And over the years we have sent out thousands of highly effective missionaries. Most of them are unsung heroes of the faith. Some became famous, such as Horace and Lillas Underwood in Korea, Sam and Jane Higginbottom in India, William Sheppard and William Morrison in the Congo, John Leighton Stuart in China, and J. Kelly Giffin in Sudan.” (The Year 2010: Two Anniversaries in the History of American Protestant Missions, https://www.presbyterianmission.org/resource/brie... page 13) Our roots in John Calvin’s theology commit us to mission and service. Calvin taught that truth is in order to goodness; that is, embodying the truth of Jesus Christ must lead us inevitably to show forth goodness in this world. Missions locally, nationally, and internationally to underserved people and people in crisis, are ways Presbyterians today continue to show forth the truth of Jesus Christ in our hearts by the work of our goodness in Christ’s name. I am delighted to be pastor of a congregation that understands that the church in mission is not an option – it is an obligation of faith in the One who came not to be served, but to serve (Mark 10:45).

Grace and Peace, Pastor Bill

Click here for a downloadable PDF of July's San Gabriel's Trumpet

bill's blog

Not much is said about missions at the time of the Protestant Reformation. Martin Luther and John Calvin were more focused on teaching protestant principals of faith, on translations of the Bible into modern European languages, and on developing a Protestant theology. It would be the first Great Awakening on American soil, roughly 1730 -1760, that would inspire any thought of mission work. The religious fervor and personal pietism that grew out of the first Great Awakening in colonial America would inspire men and women to go to the ends of the earth proclaiming the gospel of Jesus Christ. The space for this article is too short to trace all the roots and accomplishments of the Presbyterian mission movement. I grew up in the old southern Presbyterian Church in the United States (PCUS) prior to reunion with the northern church to form the PCUSA in 1983. As a child growing up in the PCUS, I remember distinctly the focus on world missions in China and Korea. According to Michael Parker, in his brief history of American Protestant missions entitled The Year 2010: Two Anniversaries in the History of American Protestant Missions, the PCUS focused its mission efforts in Brazil, China, the Congo, Japan, Korea, and Mexico. Today, one of the largest Presbyterian churches in the world is in Seoul, South Korea, with over 20,000 members! From the Congo and the Sudan, Presbyterian missionaries branched into Cameroon, establishing churches, schools, and hospitals. It is not unusual today to find Cameroonian immigrants to America still practicing their Presbyterian roots in Christianity. My two previous congregations both had members from Cameroon. Michael Parker writes: “Looking back at two hundred years of mission experience, Presbyterians can be proud of our record in mission. Presbyterian churches have been established in more than eighty countries throughout Africa, Asia, and Latin America. And over the years we have sent out thousands of highly effective missionaries. Most of them are unsung heroes of the faith. Some became famous, such as Horace and Lillas Underwood in Korea, Sam and Jane Higginbottom in India, William Sheppard and William Morrison in the Congo, John Leighton Stuart in China, and J. Kelly Giffin in Sudan.” (The Year 2010: Two Anniversaries in the History of American Protestant Missions, https://www.presbyterianmission.org/resource/brie... page 13) Our roots in John Calvin’s theology commit us to mission and service. Calvin taught that truth is in order to goodness; that is, embodying the truth of Jesus Christ must lead us inevitably to show forth goodness in this world. Missions locally, nationally, and internationally to underserved people and people in crisis, are ways Presbyterians today continue to show forth the truth of Jesus Christ in our hearts by the work of our goodness in Christ’s name. I am delighted to be pastor of a congregation that understands that the church in mission is not an option – it is an obligation of faith in the One who came not to be served, but to serve (Mark 10:45).

Grace and Peace, Pastor Bill

Click here for a downloadable PDF of July's San Gabriel's Trumpet

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